Why trade facilitation matters

Trade facilitation can reduce the cost of trade and spark competitiveness, productivity, innovation, and growth. Find out how our work is making an impact and who stands to benefit.

  • Paulina Abrokwah works hard to keep goods moving. As a freight forwarder in Ghana, she helps businesses get the right documents, comply with regulations and transport their goods across the country’s borders. Her role ensures Ghanaian consumers can buy a wide range of products and that Ghanaian businesses can export their wares across the world. Every day she deals with shipments, from cars to electronics, sending to and receiving from as far away as Mexico, China, Brazil and Europe. “The difficulties we face now in clearing the border can make the process very stressful and that can discourage people from trading,” says Paulina.
    Paulina Abrokwah Paulina Abrokwah, Freight Forwarder, Accra
  • Eston Sakala set up his own clearing and forwarding business in 2016 helping traders to move their goods in and out of Zambia – a profession he has been in for 17 years. In three short years he has grown his business from scratch to employ 18 staff with a customer base spanning Zambia’s key import and export sectors. “My goal now is to build capacity in my business, embrace technology and deliver my service to the level of a DHL,” says Eston. “I’d love to see the day when I can sit in front of my screen and watch trucks being processed by Evolution in real time, every minute, every hour. I want to be the go-to business for quick and correct clearances.”
    Eston Sakala Eston Sakala, Managing Director, Evolution Logistics and Solutions, Lusaka
  • Revathi Roy set up India’s first all-female delivery company HeyDeedee in 2016 to offer new training and professional opportunities to low-income women in Mumbai. Three years later, her business operates in 10 Indian cities, employs 10 000 women agents, and has partnerships with giants like Amazon. “A career in logistics is not an intuitive leap for Indian women since this field has been largely dominated by men. Parents see jobs in the call centre industry as a safer option for their daughters,” explains Revathi.
    Revathi Roy Revathi Roy, Co-founder and CEO, HeyDeedee, Mumbai
  • Sindy Sevilla is a coffee lover and successful entrepreneur who turned her passion for coffee into a business. She founded SB Café Los Santos in 2012 when she moved to Tarrazu, a rural area of Costa Rica. “I wanted to turn my passion into a living and make an impact by empowering local people, especially women,” explains Sindy. Positive social impact is at the heart of Sindy’s business. “Most coffee is exported as green beans. We don’t sell that because we believe it is important for Costa Rica to handle most of the transformation that adds value. We want to keep the profits in the community.”
    Sindy Sevilla Sindy Sevilla, Founder, SB Café Los Santos, Costa Rica
  • Jyoti Wadhwa is a successful entrepreneur, who sells Indian handicrafts and promotes the spirit of craftsmanship through international trade. In 2010, she set up her online business, Sanskriti Vintage, to sell vintage handicraft fabrics, various types of embroidery, and other craft items. At the time, she worked from home while taking care of her child and handled all operations single-handedly. Ten years later, she employs 25 people, supporting local artisans and serving antique collectors and aesthetes all over the world.
    Jyoti Wadhwa Jyoti Wadhwa, Founder, Sanskriti Vintage, New Delhi